DAC lives on, restricted to Port

Concerned citizens lined the back wall of the council chambers at City Hall to protest the Domain Awareness Center. Photo by Becca Andrews.

Concerned citizens lined the back wall of the council chambers at City Hall to protest the Domain Awareness Center. Photo by Becca Andrews.

Mayor Jean Quan broke a 4-4 tie at last night’s city council meeting that means Oakland will move forward with a version of its controversial Domain Awareness Center, but it will be limited until the council can gather more information and implement clear privacy and data policies.

The new plan will be restricted to the Port of Oakland, the cameras and ShotSpotter, the city’s gunfire-detection software, will not be used.

Outcry from the remaining attendees was overwhelming when Quan voted, “aye.” They chanted, “shame, shame, shame,” despite the new restrictions on the DAC.

The meeting stretched on until 1 this morning, and 124 speakers were scheduled to present their opinion to the council, all in opposition to the DAC.

Oakland Privacy spokesman Brian Hofer said Oakland suffers from a “shiny gadget syndrome,” which led to the fascination with the high-tech surveillance system.

However, he took to Twitter to express that he felt the compromise was a “major victory” despite the public outcry.

 

Oakland North reporter Becca Andrews live-tweeted the city council meeting and the DAC decision. Check out some of her tweets below.

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One Comment

  1. Safeway

    Sounds like a good compromise.

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